Conservation of Artefacts from the Pearl Shell Fleet Mothership - Sanyo Maru 1937

Dublin Core

Title

Conservation of Artefacts from the Pearl Shell Fleet Mothership - Sanyo Maru 1937

Description

During November 2016 an expedition to the Arafura Sea, led by Maritime Archaeologist David Steinberg (Heritage Branch, Department of Tourism and Culture, Northern Territory, Australia) recovered a number of artefacts from the wreck of the Sanyo Maru a mothership for the Japanese pearl shell fleet. After 78 years underwater the steel-built vessel, resting upright, still retained substantial structural integrity. The dive team investigated the stern-half of the ship penetrating the main deck house via original accessways. The steel-framed structure still enclosed the space but the intervening plating was mostly absent due to corrosion. Cabin walls were also missing. Despite the relatively open environment a surprising number and type of artefacts remained in a good state of preservation, particularly ceramic items and glass bottles (two sealed with original contents). In terms of organic materials two perfectly intact lacquerware bowls and a quantity of chopsticks were recovered. Metal objects recovered vary in condition the extent of corrosion mainly a consequence of galvanic reactions. This paper explains the preparations to manage the artefact materials from the conservation perspective, photographic recording, cleaning and packing in the field situation and laboratory conservation treatments.

Creator

Jon Carpenter

Publisher

The Museum of Underwater Archaeology

Date

11/24/2017

Rights

Jon Carpenter

Files

Citation

Jon Carpenter, “Conservation of Artefacts from the Pearl Shell Fleet Mothership - Sanyo Maru 1937 ,” The MUA Collection, accessed June 21, 2018, http://www.themua.org/collections/items/show/1828.