Interview with Session 6 co-chair Veronica Walker Vadillo.

Dublin Core

Title

Interview with Session 6 co-chair Veronica Walker Vadillo.

Description

The arrival of Spain and Portugal in Asia-Pacific in the 1500s marked a turning point in the history of the region. New foreign actors came into play: priests, merchants and mercenaries looking to save souls and profit from trade in exotic Asian goods. Far from their Iberian homeland, their deeds and actions, violent or not, resulted in a myriad of interactions that altered the life of the people who lived around their areas of influence, including that of the newcomers. This flow of people and goods circumnavigated the world by well established maritime routes. In 1565, the Spanish established the Manila galleon trade route, which linked Asia with the Americas, and from there to Europe. From the early 1500s, the Portuguese dominated the route that linked Asia with Africa, Brazil and Europe in what is known as the Roteiro. The most visible archaeological evidence of these trade routes is the ships in which the goods were transported around the globe, and also the interaction with different cultures that were located in trading posts along these routes. But through contact also came knowledge exchange and other subtle changes including the migration of people, flora, and fauna. In this session we want to discuss archaeological, historical, and ethnographic evidence that remains of this global enterprise that connected Europe to Asia through maritime trade, and all the entrepôts that stood along the way.

Creator

Veronica Walker Vadillo and Brian Fahy

Date

6/11/2014

Files

Citation

Veronica Walker Vadillo and Brian Fahy, “Interview with Session 6 co-chair Veronica Walker Vadillo.,” The MUA Collection, accessed February 8, 2023, http://www.themua.org/collections/items/show/1664.