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Potential for Spanish Colonial Archaeology in the Northern Mariana Islands

Title

Potential for Spanish Colonial Archaeology in the Northern Mariana Islands

Subject

Session 9
Spain and the Asia-Pacific region

Description

Spanish cultural heritage continues to play a role in social, cultural and political developments in Micronesia and can contribute to a broader understanding of Indigenous and Spanish histories in the Pacific. Thus, Spanish cultural heritage should be appropriately identified and incorporated into a cultural heritage management and research framework in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI). Unfortunately, this is not the case and Spanish cultural heritage is long overdue for serious investigation and research in the CNMI.

This paper is the result of a preliminary project conducted in 2009 into the potential for research on Spanish cultural heritage in the CNMI. This project aimed at facilitating the process of documenting Spanish cultural heritage by identifying known and potential heritage recorded in disparate sources such as grey literature, primary and secondary historical sources located in library, archive and museum holdings and conversations with heritage practitioners. The methodology used during this survey included a thematic assessment framework whereby the known and potential Spanish cultural heritage was categorised into research themes. It is hoped that this approach will contribute to evaluating the significance of Spanish cultural heritage for research and management purposes in the CNMI.

Creator

Jennifer F. McKinnon
Jason T. Raupp

Date

November 2011

Files

Citation

Jennifer F. McKinnon and Jason T. Raupp, “Potential for Spanish Colonial Archaeology in the Northern Mariana Islands,” The MUA Collection, accessed December 19, 2014, http://www.themua.org/collections/items/show/1198.

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