Expedient Field Modifications of a WWII Amphibious Landing Craft in Saipan

Dublin Core

Title

Expedient Field Modifications of a WWII Amphibious Landing Craft in Saipan

Subject

Session 1:
Contexts of War and Conflict in Maritime and Underwater Cultural Heritage Research and Management

Description

The June 1944 the United States of America's (USA) invasion of Saipan was the largest amphibious invasion of a Pacific island up to that time. Specialized craft constructed specifically for this invasion were utilized in order to deliver American forces across Saipan’s fringing reefs and lagoons to shore with relative safety. Although these amphibious craft, known as Landing Vehicles Tracked (LVTs), were designed for this particular incursion, the troops operating these vehicles found it necessary to modify their vessels to better suit anticipated combat needs. Modifications of this sort have been termed field expedient armor modifications (Boal 2006). Field expedient armor modifications to LVTs influenced future production designs following the launch of the first model and can be traced through archaeological and historical records. These modifications are demonstrated in an LVT (A)-4 archaeologically recorded in Saipan and are testament to the ingenuity and survival instincts of the crews that operated these machines.

Creator

W. Shawn Arnold

Date

November 2011

Files

Citation

W. Shawn Arnold, “Expedient Field Modifications of a WWII Amphibious Landing Craft in Saipan,” The MUA Collection, accessed December 13, 2017, http://www.themua.org/collections/items/show/1190.

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