Browse Items (10 total)

The ancient boat was made around the 7th century A.D. It was found on July 26, 2008 at 07.30 p.m. at Punjulharjo Village, Rembang Regency, Central Java Province, Indonesia. The boat site is covered by soil as deep as two metres and is located at the…

On the banks of the Murray River in the small township of Mannum, South Australia, lies an impressive and rare feat of early colonial maritime infrastructure; the Randell Dry Dock. Originally constructed as a timber floating dock in 1873, it was…

Over the past few decades, the archaeological community has been moving away from the more traditional methods of excavation and recovery of underwater cultural heritage (UCH) towards a less intrusive management approach, essentially involving the…

The VOC ship Avondster sunk on 2nd July 1659 when anchoring near the beach in Galle Bay, geographically located in the southern part of Sri Lanka. She was re-discovered in 1993 and subjected to a series of research projects including excavation in…

Working on a shipwreck means analyzing its cargo, taking samples and when access is possible, studying the naval architecture. After publication, in many cases, closing and securing the site is possible.

Excavating a settlement or an underwater…

Waterlogged archaeological bamboo works such as bamboo slips and bamboo baskets, etc. were unearthed during excavations of the Mado shipwreck No. 1 excavation in 2009. Despite the number of bamboo artefacts recovered from underwater sites, the…

Australian wooden shipwrecks represent significant submerged heritage sites with huge potential to inform on historic connections, technological innovation and early colonial behavioural systems. Their archaeological potential is unfortunately often…

Since 1976, the underwater excavation program, which began with the Shinan ship, has yielded some 94,500 relics and eleven shipwrecks (including two foreign ships) from 18 sites in Korea. To conserve each material appropriately the artifacts…

As waterlogged wood is ubiquitous in excavation sites, being used for structures (ships and buildings), tools, personal effects and for decorative artefacts, this material has been the subject of most conservation research and treatment over the past…

The use of subcritical fluids for the treatment of archaeological and marine archaeological iron artifacts has been under experimentation at the Clemson University’s Warren Lasch Conservation Center (WLCC) since 2003 and has shown promise of…
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