2017 Session 7: Underwater Cultural Heritage Politics, Laws, Ethics and Values

Dublin Core

Title

2017 Session 7: Underwater Cultural Heritage Politics, Laws, Ethics and Values

Description

All cultural materials are potentially cultural resources. However, because not all of them can be preserved or studied, choices must be made based on evaluation and re-evaluation. Values are learned and depend on cultural, intellectual, historical, and psychological frames of reference. Consequently, valuation is made individually, but is shared by communities. Valuation of underwater cultural heritage has, then, a broad range of determining value depending on the community to which it belongs.

A clear example of this is the protection of human remains. The 2001 UNESCO Convention includes, in its definition of underwater cultural heritage, human remains which have been underwater for more than 100 years. However, the Christian philosophy on the treatment of human remains is different to that of Asian philosophy that teaches that human remains will never become underwater cultural heritage since, if they are seen by someone in an underwater site, it is imperative to rescue the human remains and bury them on land according to their beliefs.

This session aims to create a forum for policymakers, managers, and archaeologists devoted to underwater cultural heritage where they can share their experiences of and research on the valuation of underwater cultural heritage. We aim to accept papers that help us to understand the definition of ‘underwater cultural heritage’ in the Asia-Pacific regions, comparing those definitions with the definition of the 2001 UNESCO Convention and trying to find a common interpretation. We will also be looking to examine the meaning of the underwater cultural heritage sites and objects for different communities. Finally, we will be expecting papers exploring the different possibilities of the use and/or conservation of this underwater cultural heritage according to the values and needs of the different communities.

Creator

Elena Perez-Alvaro
Licit Cultural Heritage Ltd., UK

Items in the 2017 Session 7: Underwater Cultural Heritage Politics, Laws, Ethics and Values Collection

The elaboration of the UNESCO 2001 Convention on the Protection of the Underwater Cultural Heritage
The UNESCO Convention on the Protection of the Underwater Cultural Heritage was adopted in 2001. Like many such treaties, its text is the result of a compromise between opposing views. The negotiations leading to this instruments started in the…

Preservation of Underwater Cultural Heritage in Taiwan: Legislation and Challenges
The Convention on the Protection of the Underwater Cultural Heritage was adopted in 2001 by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). The convention acknowledges the importance of underwater cultural heritage as…

The ethics behind climate change: Small Island Developing States in the Pacific as new underwater cultural heritage
Predictions forecast changes in climate that may affect underwater cultural heritage in the future. Warmer waters mean more chemical changes and the proliferation of teredo navalis. Ocean currents may cause disturbances to the layer of sediment…

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